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Fake Components, Low Quality Parts, and Defective Electronics Used by Government Contractors in Building War Planes, Missile Defense Systems, Military Equipment, and other Military Supplies Can Cause Fatal Accidents and be the Basis for Military Contractor Procurement Fraud Qui Tam Lawsuits and Defense Contractor Procurement Fraud Whistleblower Lawsuits by Military Contractor Fake Part Procurement Fraud Lawyer, False Certification Procurement Fraud Whistleblower Reward Lawyer, and Military Electronic Part Supply Chain Fraud Lawyer Jason Coomer

Military contractor procurement fraud and Defense Contractor false certification fraud in the electronic component supply chain have increased as some government contractors and subcontractors are using cheaper electronic parts from China, India, Mexico, and other countries to fulfill government contracts.  As a result these military  contractors use defective military electronic components, defective military electronic parts, and defective military equipment parts in war planes, missile systems, and other military equipment.  Whistleblowers that have independent knowledge of military electronic component supply chain procurement fraud committed against the government by government contractors and subcontractors can blow the whistle on the military procurement fraud and if they are the first to provide notice of the fraud can recover a large financial reward for helping the government identify and stop procurement fraud.

If you are aware of defense contractor supply chain procurement fraud, defective military equipment fraud, military electronic component fraud, military procurement fraud, or other government contractor procurement fraud, please feel free to contact Military Contractor Procurement Fraud Lawyer, False Certification Procurement Fraud Lawyer, and Military Contractor Electronic Component Fake Part Procurement Fraud Lawyer, Jason Coomer, via e-mail  or use our online submission form for a free review of a government contractor procurement fraud qui tam claim.

Over a Million Fake Components Have Been Used by Government Contractors In United States War Planes Many of these Fake Part Came from China

"The US Senate Armed Services Committee said its researchers had uncovered 1,800 cases in which the Pentagon had been sold electronics that may be counterfeit.  In total, the committee said it had found more than a million fake parts had made their way into warplanes such as the Boeing C-17 transport jet and the Lockheed Martin C-130J 'Super Hercules'.  It also found fake components in Boeing's CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter and the Theatre High-Altitude Area Defence (THAAD) missile defence system. 'A million parts is surely a huge number. But I want to repeat this: we have only looked at a portion of the defence supply chain. So those 1,800 cases are just the tip of the iceberg,' said Senator Carl Levin. In around seven in 10 cases, the fake parts originated in China, while investigators traced another 20 per cent of cases to the United Kingdom and Canada, known resale points for Chinese counterfeits." US weapons 'full of fake Chinese parts' Thousands of United States' warplanes, ships and missiles contain fake electronic components from China, leaving them open to malfunction, according to a US Senate committee.

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by Government Contractor Procurement Fraud Lawyer

False Certification of Product Quality commonly occurs after a product has been approved for mass production.  The original prototypes of a product are typically created with high quality materials and parts including strong metals, seals, plastics, and components.  However, after the original prototypes have been tested and approved, some defense contractors use inferior parts and materials to lower costs that make weapons, ships, vehicles, computers, electronics, and other military goods less reliable, weaker, and more prone to not work when needed.  The defense contractor that provides a false certification of a product's quality has committed a false certification that may subject the defense contractor to a Government Contractor Procurement Fraud False Certification of Product Quality Whistleblower Reward Lawsuit.


Coos Bay Company, Its Owner and Six Employees Indicted for Fraud on Defense Contracts

EUGENE, Ore. — A Coos Bay business, its owner, and six employees were arraigned in federal court today on an indictment returned by a federal grand jury on December 14, 2011. The indictment alleges that Kustom Products, Inc. (KPI), a vehicle parts supply business located in Coos Bay, Oregon, its owner, and six employees committed fraud on contracts with the United States Department of Defense (DoD) valued at over $7.5 million. The indicted owner is Harold Ray Bettencourt II. The indicted employees are Bettencourt’s former wife (Kathy Sue Bettencourt), three of his sons (Harold Ray Bettencourt III [Bo], Nicholas Ryan Bettencourt and Peter Tracy Bettencourt), his office manager (Margo Antonette Densmore), and his purchasing agent (Joshua Lee Kemp). The indictment alleges that KPI, Bettencourt, and the others committed wire fraud, conspiracy to commit wire fraud, fraud involving aircraft parts, money laundering, and conspiracy to commit money laundering. It also alleges that all proceeds traceable to the fraud are to be forfeited including $365,503.26 in funds from 20 bank accounts, eight vehicles, one boat, two boat trailers, two jet skis, and three all-terrain vehicles.

Harold Ray Bettencourt II, 57, lives in Coos Bay, Oregon; Kathy Sue Bettencourt, 54, resides in Myrtle Point, Oregon; Bo Bettencourt, 31, Nicholas Ryan Bettencourt, 29, and Peter Tracy Bettencourt, 25, all reside in North Bend, Oregon. Margo Antonette Densmore, 40, and Joshua Lee Kemp, 37, are from Coos Bay, Oregon.

The indictment alleges that KPI and a predecessor business, Southern Oregon Sterling Parts and Service (SOS), provided nonconforming, defective and counterfeit products to the DoD for the purpose of increasing their profit margin. It alleges that KPI and SOS committed fraud on at least 392 contracts resulting in payments of $7,523,406.59. The indictment alleges that the various nonconforming and counterfeit products where provided to the DoD from KPI through DoD supply centers in Columbus, Ohio; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Richmond, Virginia. Some of the products were critical application items, defined as items essential to weapons systems performance or operation, or the preservation of life or safety of operational personnel. Examples were defective aviation locknuts for the Kiowa helicopter. These locknuts were used on the main rotor assembly of the Kiowa helicopter and were flight critical because the failure of the main rotary assembly could be catastrophic, resulting in death or serious injury to military personnel. Other critical application items included clamp loops used in C-5 military transport plane engines and other aircraft.

The indictment alleges that Harold Bettencourt II facilitated the scheme by directing other defendants to carry out actions on behalf of KPI and its predecessor SOS, such as making false representations in contracts, providing non-conforming and counterfeit products, and providing false documents to the DoD. The indictment includes a number of examples of how the fraud was committed, and explains how some products were counterfeited in Mexico or obtained in China, even though KPI represented them to be from DoD-approved manufacturers in the United States. The DoD-approved manufacturers whose parts were counterfeited or otherwise misrepresented to be genuine include Caterpillar, Inc., BAE Systems Land and Armaments, Freightliner, Pacific Industrial Components, Inc., and SPS Technologies. The indictment also alleges that KPI and its predecessor SOS counterfeited heat treatment certifications of Timber Products Inspection, Inc., on wood packaging materials in order to decrease expenses and increase profits.

The indictment charges all defendants with wire fraud and conspiracy to commit wire fraud. The maximum statutory penalty for wire fraud and conspiracy to commit wire fraud is a 20 year term of imprisonment and a $250,000.00 fine, followed by a three year term of supervised release. It also charges Harold Ray Bettencourt II, Nicholas Ryan Bettencourt and Joshua Lee Kemp with fraud involving aircraft parts. The maximum statutory penalty for fraud involving aircraft parts is a 10 year prison term and $250,000.00 fine, followed by a three year term of supervised release. The indictment also charges Harold Ray Bettencourt II, Kathy Sue Bettencourt, Bo Bettencourt, Nicholas Ryan Bettencourt, Margo Antonette Densmore and KPI with money laundering and conspiracy to commit money laundering. The maximum statutory penalty for money laundering is a 10 year prison term and $250,000.00 fine, followed by a three year term of supervised release.

The matter is scheduled for trial before United States District Judge Michael R. Hogan on June 27, 2012. All defendants were released on conditions pending trial.

Amanda Marshall, United States Attorney for the District of Oregon, emphasized the serious nature of the charges: “The allegation that military personnel were placed in harm’s way for the sole purpose of financial profit warrants vigorous investigation and prosecution.”

A criminal indictment is only an allegation and not evidence of guilt. All defendants are presumed to be innocent unless and until proven guilty.

The case is being investigated by the Department of Defense/Office of Inspector General/Defense Criminal Investigative Service, the Army Criminal Investigative Division Major Procurement Fraud Unit, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation Division, the Social Security Administration/Office of Inspector General, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U. S. Attorney Sean B. Hoar.


Former America’s Most Wanted Fugitive Sentenced in Virginia to 105 Years in Prison for Leading International Conspiracy to Defraud the Military

WASHINGTON – Roger Charles Day Jr., a former America’s Most Wanted fugitive, was sentenced today to 105 years in prison for his role in leading an international conspiracy to defraud the Department of Defense (DOD) of more than $11.2 million by supplying nonconforming and defective parts for military aircraft, vehicles and weapons systems.

The sentence was announced today by U.S. Attorney Neil H. MacBride of the Eastern District of Virginia; Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Criminal Division; Special Agent in Charge Robert E. Craig of the Defense Criminal Investigative Service (DCIS) Mid-Atlantic Field Office; and Special Agent in Charge Edward T. Bradley of the DCIS Northeast Field Office.

Day, 47, formerly of Long Valley, N.J., was also ordered by U.S. District Judge John Gibney to forfeit 3,496 ounces of gold bars and coins, two sport utility vehicles and $2.1 million, which together represents his proceeds from the scheme. In addition, Judge Gibney ordered Day to pay a $3 million punitive fine and $6.2 million in restitution to the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), the DOD entity that Day defrauded.

On Aug. 25, 2011, Day was found guilty on all counts, following a nine-day jury trial. Day was charged in August 2008 with conspiracy to commit wire fraud, wire fraud, conspiracy to engage in international money laundering and conspiracy to smuggle gold out of the United States. Day was extradited from Mexico in December 2010 following his arrest in Cancun, Mexico, resulting from a story which aired on America’s Most Wanted pertaining to Day.

“Mr. Day’s greed put the men and women in the U.S. military in harm’s way,” said U.S. Attorney MacBride. “He is a serial fraudster who made millions by exploiting the military supply chain during a time of armed conflict. Today’s sentence ensures that he will never again put our military in danger again.”

“Mr. Day orchestrated a complex, multi-year fraud scheme that jeopardized the safety of our nation’s military personnel,” said Assistant Attorney General Breuer. “He operated this scheme from outside the United States, in an attempt to escape justice, and he deliberately provided defective equipment to the Department of Defense. Today’s lengthy prison sentence reflects the seriousness of Mr. Day’s reckless crimes.”

“The sentencing of Roger Day to 105 years in prison culminates a highly successful investigation and represents an unprecedented sentence for a product substitution investigation by the Defense Criminal Investigative Service with audit support by the Defense Contract Audit Agency. Through his many schemes to defraud the Department of Defense, Day exploited the Department’s complex acquisition process,” said DCIS Special Agents in Charge Bradley and Craig in a joint statement. “It is unpardonable that individuals endeavor to enrich themselves by stealing from the U.S. taxpayer through fraud, especially by denying critical goods to our warfighters combating terrorism in a hostile overseas environment. The Defense Criminal Investigative Service remains resolute in our commitment to aggressively investigate these crimes and to support their prosecution to the fullest.”

According to the evidence at trial and court documents, over a four-year period, Day led a conspiracy to bid on and win contracts to provide parts to the U.S. military for military aircraft, vehicles and weapons systems through the DLA, including through the DLA’s Defense Supply Center in Richmond, Va. The parts included “critical application items,” which are essential to weapons system performance or to the preservation of the lives and safety of operating personnel.

In the course of the scheme, Day and other conspirators, operating in the United States, Canada, Mexico and Belize, formed at least 18 separate companies that posed as legitimate contractors and collectively used a computer program to win nearly 1,000 lucrative contract awards for the various companies. Day and his conspirators then shipped defective parts to the DOD on more than 300 of those contracts, receiving more than $4.4 million in payment on parts that Day purchased for less than $200,000.

In all known cases, the parts sent by Day and his conspirators could not be used for their intended purpose. In one instance, a U.S. Air Force master sergeant at Patrick Air Force Base in Florida was unable to perform necessary testing of missile detection systems on HC-130 aircraft for a period of seven weeks because of a defective Day-supplied part. In another instance, technicians at Robins Air Force Base in Georgia who had requested a new part for the radar control panel of a C-130 aircraft received a bogus part supplied by Day and were required to instead take a used part from another aircraft to complete the necessary repair.

Day and his co-conspirators compounded the fraud by concealing their identities through the use of multiple nominee companies and by assuming others’ identities to operate the companies. When DOD requested proof that the companies had purchased and intended to supply the correct parts from approved manufacturers, Day and others submitted fabricated documents that falsely represented that the correct parts had been purchased. When DOD debarred several of the companies from doing further business with the military, Day directed his conspirators to discontinue bidding through those companies and instead form and use new companies.

According to evidence presented at trial, to conceal the proceeds of the scheme and to prevent recovery, Day directed his conspirators to transfer the scheme’s proceeds to offshore bank accounts and ultimately to purchase more than 3,500 ounces (more than $2.2 million) in gold bars and coins.

Before starting his most recent scheme, Day was sentenced in August 1999 in the District of New Jersey to 97 months in prison for a similar scheme to defraud the DOD and other government agencies, and Day was sentenced in October 1999 in New Jersey state court to 84 months in prison for schemes to defraud the city of Newark, N.J. and the Newark Board of Education. While serving his federal sentence, Day filed hundreds of billions of dollars of fraudulent default judgments against more than 100 people who Day claimed had prosecuted him unfairly, including the prior case’s investigating agents, the prosecuting attorneys, Day’s former defense counsel and the U.S. district judge who sentenced him in New Jersey.

Prior to Day’s trial, five defendants in this conspiracy pleaded guilty. Nathan Francis Victor Carroll was sentenced on Nov. 8, 2007, to 94 months in prison and was ordered to pay nearly $3.7 million in restitution. Gregory Allen Stewart was sentenced on April 29, 2008, to 75 months in prison and was ordered to pay nearly $3.7 million in restitution. Susan Crotty Neufeld was sentenced on May 14, 2008, to five years of probation and ordered to pay $47,600 in restitution for the gold coins she received. Juerg Mehr was sentenced to five years of probation on March 27, 2009. Glenn Teal was sentenced on Sept. 22, 2009, to 90 days in prison.

This case was investigated by the Defense Criminal Investigative Service, with assistance from the Defense Contract Audit Agency. The case was prosecuted by former Assistant U.S. Attorney John S. Davis and Assistant U.S. Attorney Elizabeth C. Wu of the Eastern District of Virginia and Special Assistant U.S. Attorney and Fraud Section Trial Attorney Ryan S. Faulconer of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division. The Criminal Division’s Office of International Affairs provided assistance.

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False Certification of Product Quality commonly occurs after a product has been approved for mass production.  The original prototypes of a product are typically created with high quality materials and parts including strong metals, seals, plastics, and components.  However, after the original prototypes have been tested and approved, some defense contractors use inferior parts and materials to lower costs that make weapons, ships, vehicles, computers, electronics, and other military goods less reliable, weaker, and more prone to not work when needed.  The defense contractor that provides a false certification of a product's quality has committed a false certification that may subject the defense contractor to a Government Contractor Procurement Fraud False Certification of Product Quality Whistleblower Reward Lawsuit.

The Defense of Department often requires its contractors to build weapons systems in accordance with very detailed product specifications because quality and reliability are critical with weapons systems and other military equipment. Failure to comply with these specifications and falsely certifying that these specifications were met can cause death and place our troops in danger.  As such it is extremely important that  appropriate quality assurance steps are taken in building or producing weapons systems and other military equipment and that a defense contractor's certification of compliance with these specifications can be trusted.

Similar to Government Contractor Procurement Fraud False Certification of Product Quality Qui Tam Claims are Government Contractor Procurement Fraud Product Substitution False Claims.  These claims occur when a Defense Contractor that is under a government contract that specifies that the defense contractor build products using a certain grade, quality of parts, or materials & parts from American companies, fails to comply with the contract. These Defense Contractors often decide it is more profitable to use or substitute inferior parts or parts not made by American companies.  Defense Contractors that use inferior parts or parts not made by American Companies as required by their government contract may be subject to a Government Contractor Procurement Fraud Product Substitution False Claim Act Whistleblower Lawsuit.

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Defense contractor procurement fraud is a common way that government contractors defraud the United States Government and taxpayers out of large amounts of money.  Many whistle blowers have been successful in blowing the whistle on defense contractor procurement fraud and revealed procurement fraud schemes that put our troops in danger and steal money from the United States.  Under Federal False Claims Act litigation billions of dollars have been regained from these procurement fraud defense contractors.  Some common ways defense contractors commit procurement fraud and cheat the government are false certification of product quality, product substitution, cross charging, false certification of services provided, charging for Services or Goods not provided, and Violations of the Truth-in-Negotiations Act ("TINA"), and Improper Cost Allocation.

Through government contractor fraud qui tam lawsuits and other federal false claims act lawsuits, whistleblowers, the United States Department of Justice, and fraudulent contractor qui lawyers have helped the government recover billions of dollars that was wrongfully taken through fraud from the government.  Often in these cases the fraudulent government contractor has paid off key government officials to look the other way and it is essential to have a whistleblower with specialized knowledge of the fraud to expose the contractor fraud.  In other cases, the fraudulent government contractor is exploiting a lack of efficient supervision in the bureaucratic system.  In these cases, it also typically takes a whistleblower with specialized knowledge to locate the fraud and expose it.

For more information on War Profiteering Whistleblower Qui Tam Lawsuits, Defense Contractor False Certification Lawsuits, and other Government Contractor Procurement Fraud Lawsuits, please go to the following web page on War Profiteering Whistleblower Qui Tam Lawsuit, Defense Contractor False Certification Lawsuit, and other Government Contractor Procurement Fraud Lawsuit Information.  

Government Contracting, Acquisitions, and Regulations

Federal Government Contracting can be extremely complicated, but lucrative.   Civil False Claims Act creates financial incentives for private citizens that have knowledge of government contractor fraud to blow the whistle on these fraudulent contractors. Whistleblowers under the act not only receive protection from the government for their A key provision of the act was known as qui tam.

WIFCON.com serves "the federal acquisition community by providing quick access to acquisition information such as contracting laws and pending legislation, current and proposed regulations, guidance, courts and boards of contract appeals, bid protest decisions, contracting newsletters, and selected analysis of federal acquisition issues."  For more information on Federal Government Contracting, please go to the following web site, WIFCON.com.- Where in Federal Contracting?

Federal Business Opportunities is also an excellent web site for information on Federal Government Contractors and Contracting.  For more information on Federal Government Contracting, please go to the following web site, Federal Business Opportunities.

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The increased government spending over the past decade created an environment where many corporations, dishonest government contractors, fraudulent government sub-contractors, and other dishonest people have begun committing procurement fraud including systematic procurement fraud against the government including the Department of Defense.  This government contractor procurement fraud has defrauded the government out of large amounts of money.  As such, the government is offering large financial rewards for government contractor procurement fraud whistleblowers that are aware of fraudulent billing of the government.  These government contractor procurement fraud whistleblowers can often work with government contractor procurement fraud whistleblowers lawyers and the Department of Justice to expose fraudulent government contractors and criminals that are committing procurement fraud. 


Government Contractor Procurement Fraud Lawsuits and Government Contractor Procurement Fraud Actions

The United States Department of Justice is working with procurement fraud whistleblowers to root out government contractor fraud committed in connection with the procurement of goods and services used by our military and civilian agencies, including fraud that affects our men and women fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. Since January 2009, procurement fraud cases, including the non-war related procurement fraud recoveries have accounted for over $1.01 billion in recoveries – more than the Department's recoveries in 2007 and 2008 combined. The Department’s recoveries since 2009 include more than $718 million attributable to Department of Defense contracts.

Ensuring that our military and procurement systems are protected from fraud is vitally important. Using the False Claims Act, the Department is aggressively pursuing fraud in connection with the wars in Southwest Asia. During fiscal year 2010, the Civil Division recovered $10.6 million in these cases. To date, settlements and judgments in procurement fraud cases involving the wars in Southwest Asia total $152.2 million. Of this amount, $129.7 million has been recovered since January 2009.

The Department has intervened in a case against Public Warehousing Company, a multi-billion dollar defense contractor that is alleged to have engaged in war profiteering on three prime vendor contracts (for which it was paid $9.8 billion) with the Defense Logistics Agency to supply food to U.S. troops in Kuwait, Jordan, and Iraq. At home, the Department is leading an investigation into companies, as well as individual executives, who manufacture and sell defective Zylon fabric used as the key ballistic material in bulletproof vests sold to the United States for use by federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies. The investigation has revealed that these vests degraded quickly over time due to heat and humidity and were unfit for ballistic use. Thus far, the Department has obtained more than $59 million in this effort, and the investigation continues today.

In addition to investigating and initiating cases that target procurement fraud, the Division also aggressively pursues counterclaims when fraudulent conduct surfaces in defensive matters. The Division handles defensive procurement cases when they are filed in the United States Court of Federal Claims. The Division has had substantial success in recent years in obtaining judgments and settlements stemming from fraud in such cases, which often involve inflated contractor damages claims. For example, in Daewoo Engineering v. United States, the Department of Justice collected approximately $51 million in 2010 in settlement of fraud claims arising from a contract dispute concerning the construction of a road in Palau. The Division also recently settled for $9 million fraud claims in Securitas v. United States, a case concerning security guard contracts for services at United States military installations in Germany.


The Defense Procurement Fraud Clearinghouse

The Defense Procurement Fraud Debarment (DPFD) Clearinghouse, was established in 1993 and has been assigned to the Bureau of of Justice. This provision required the U.S. Attorney General to establish a single point of contact for contractors or subcontractors of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to promptly confirm whether potential employees have been convicted of fraud or any other felony arising out of a contract with the Department of Defense. The clearinghouse serves as this point of contact and is the repository for all DPFD-related records.

Legislation: The Defense Procurement Fraud Debarment (DPFD) Clearing house was established by Section 815, Subsection 10, of the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year (FY) 1993 [Public Law 102-484, United States Code, Section 2408 (c)].

Clearinghouse Data Submissions: Defense-related fraud and felony cases are tried in federal court and prosecuted by a U.S. Attorney. U.S. Attorneys' Offices submit copies of sentencing orders for all individuals convicted of defense-related fraud or felony in their districts to the Defense Procurement Fraud Debarment Clearinghouse on a quarterly basis. BJA maintains a list of people who have been disqualified from contracting with DoD based on these sentencing orders.

Clearinghouse Services: The clearinghouse responds to inquiries from federal agencies, DoD contractors, and first-tier subcontractors as required to determine employment or contract eligibility. The clearinghouse also forwards pertinent information to the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA), where the information is coded to identify the specific category of federal exclusion which is included in the GSA publication Lists of Parties Excluded From Federal Procurement or Non-procurement Programs, more commonly known as the Debarment List or EPLS. The exclusion is categorized according to the specific cause (i.e., the statute violated and the treatment or exclusion).

Information for DoD Contractors DoD contractors and subcontractors should verify that potential employees have not been debarred and are not on the current List of Parties Excluded from Federal Procurement or Non-procurement Programs (EPLS). Individuals who have been convicted of fraud or any other felony arising out of a contract with DoD are prohibited from contracting with or being employed by any DoD contractor, as stipulated under the National Defense Authorization Act of 1989 (Public Law 100-456).

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The basic premise of "qui tam actions" is to encourage private citizens to step up and blow the whistle on fraud.  Qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act are based on the theory that one of the least expensive and most effective means of preventing fraud on taxpayers and the government is to make the perpetrators of government fraud liable to actions by private persons acting under the strong stimulus of personal ill will and potential of large economic gain.

The strong public policy behind creating an economic gain for whistleblowers is that  the government would be significantly less likely to learn of the allegations of fraud, but for persons in certain positions with specialized knowledge of fraud that has been committed. Congress has made it clear that creating this economic incentive is beneficial not only for the government, taxpayers, and the realtor, but is an efficient method of regulating government to prevent fraud and fraudulent schemes.

The central purpose of the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act is to set up financial incentives to supplement government regulation and enforcement by encouraging whistleblowers with specialized knowledge of fraud going on in the government to blow the whistle on the crime.

The whistleblower's share of recovery is a maximum of 30 percent and the government's prior knowledge of fraud now does not necessarily bar a whistleblower from collecting lost revenue. If the government takes over the lawsuit, the relator can "continue as a party to the action." The defendant is also required to pay for the relator's attorney fees. The whistleblower is also protected from retaliatory actions by his or her employer. As a result of the 1986 amendment and subsequent amendments to the False Claims Act, qui tam lawsuits have increased dramatically.   Though the law was first enacted for corrupt defense contractors during the civil war, the subsequent amendments has uncovered fraudulent government contractors building roads, bridges, and other public works as well as health care providers and others committing Medicare fraud.  So far, billions of dollars have been recovered.

Anyone who defrauds the government out of revenue can be held accountable under the False Claims Act. Common defendants include defense contractors, health care providers, other government contractors & subcontractors, state and local government agencies,  and private universities. Whistleblowers often include current and former employees of the defrauding company, competitors of government contractors and public interest groups.

The False Claims Act was enacted to encourage private citizens to assist the government in the fight against fraud. Often the whistleblower faces an uphill battle as large, powerful corporations or individuals are usually named as defendants. An experienced attorney in qui tam claims may help you gain a percentage of stolen government funds.

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Government Contractor Procurement Fraud Lawyers work with whistleblowers to expose deceptive and corrupt government contractors that are committing procurement fraud.  For more information on other potential whistleblower reward lawsuits, please see the sitemap for this web site.

As a Federal Government Contractor Procurement Fraud Lawyer, Jason Coomer, works with other Military Contractor Procurement Fraud Qui Tam Lawyers throughout the throughout the United States to handle large Military Procurement Fraud Whistleblower Reward Lawsuits.  He commonly works with Houston Military Contractor Procurement Fraud Lawyers, Dallas Military Procurement Fraud Qui Tam Lawyers, San Antonio Government Contractor Military Electronics Procurement Fraud Lawyers, Washington Military Contractor Procurement Fraud Lawyers, New York Defense Contractor Procurement Fraud Qui Tam Lawyers, Virginia Defense Contractor Procurement Fraud Lawyers, and other Qui Tam Lawyers to help American heroes blow the whistle on corrupt government contractors.

Anyone who defrauds the government out of funds can be held accountable under the False Claims Act.  Potential defendants include defense contractors, health care providers, other government contractors & subcontractors, banks & financial institutes, state and local government agencies, and private universities. Whistleblowers often include current and former employees of the defrauding company, competitors of government contractors and public interest groups.

As some government contractors and subcontractors are using cheaper electronic parts from China, India, Mexico, and other countries to fulfill government contracts, China Supply Chain Whistleblowers, India Supply Chain Whistleblowers, Mexico Supply Chain Whistleblowers, and other International Whistleblowers are needed to step forward and blow the whistle on procurement fraud.  These International Whistleblowers can receive large financial rewards for properly blowing the whistle on Military Procurement Fraud, Health Care Procurement Fraud, and Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Violations.

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Whistleblowers that have independent knowledge of military electronic component supply chain procurement fraud committed against the government by government contractors and subcontractors can blow the whistle on the military procurement fraud and if they are the first to provide notice of the fraud can recover a large financial reward for helping the government identify and stop procurement fraud.

If you are aware of defense contractor supply chain procurement fraud, defective military equipment fraud, military electronic component fraud, military procurement fraud, or other government contractor procurement fraud, please feel free to contact Military Contractor Procurement Fraud Lawyer, False Certification Procurement Fraud Lawyer, and Military Contractor Electronic Component Fake Part Procurement Fraud Lawyer, Jason Coomer, via e-mail  or use our online submission form for a free review of a government contractor procurement fraud qui tam claim.

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